FAQ

Obtaining Services

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

General Questions



Obtaining Services


Who are you and what are your credentials?

Services are provided exclusively by Dr. Gregory S. Chasson, a Licensed Clinical Psychologist, the owner of Obsessive-Compulsive Solutions of Chicago, and an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at Illinois Institute of Technology. Please see the About page for more details about Dr. Chasson and his credentials.

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Where are you located?

Our location, contact information, and instructions for driving, parking, and public transportation can be found on the Contact page.

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Are you accessible via public transportation?

Our location, contact information, and instructions for driving, parking, and public transportation can be found on the Contact page.

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Is parking available?

Our location, contact information, and instructions for driving, parking, and public transportation can be found on the Contact page.

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Do you provide services to children?

Services are provided to children (aged 9 years and up), adolescents, and adults.

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Can I obtain treatment if I live outside of Chicagoland?

Yes, but patients are responsible for all travel and lodging expenses and arrangements. In certain circumstances, telemental health services (i.e., using secure video chat software for treatment) may be available.

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How long does it take to obtain services?

The wait time varies based on the type of services requested and Dr. Chasson’s current availability. Some seasons, like summer, may have more availability than others because of Dr. Chasson’s responsibilities as an Associate Professor at Illinois Institute of Technology. Please contact Obsessive-Compulsive Solutions of Chicago for more information about the current wait for services.

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What are the fees for your services?

Dr. Chasson does not take insurance directly but offers a sliding scale based on the verifiable household income of whoever is paying for services. Please contact Dr. Chasson to determine your fee. The initial consultation is 2 hours and costs twice the hourly fee.

A portion of the cost of treatment might be reimbursed through your mental health insurance if (1) you have a plan that allows for out-of-network reimbursement, (2) you submit invoices to your insurance (OCS Chicago can provide you with invoices), and (3) a deductible has been met, if you have a deductible. Please note that most instances of reimbursement account for only a portion of Dr. Chasson’s session fee. Why? Many insurance companies believe a psychotherapy session is worth less money than what was actually charged by the provider. The insurance company therefore caps the reimbursement amount based on what they believe is a fair charge. In addition, there is usually a reduction in reimbursement based on a plan-specific patient co-pay/co-insurance amount. Find out more by contacting your insurance company, including finding out reimbursement rates, deductible amounts, and co-pay/co-insurance adjustment. When speaking with the insurance company, please refer to reimbursement rates for service codes 90834 (standard 45-minute psychotherapy session) and 90791 (standard psychological evaluation). These are called CPT codes (i.e., Current Procedural Terminology codes for treatment services).

Please note that patients are fully responsible for remitting payment at the time services are rendered and are also responsible for corresponding with their insurance company when arranging for and obtaining reimbursement.

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Do you take insurance?

Dr. Chasson does not take insurance directly but offers a sliding scale based on the verifiable household income of whoever is paying for services. Please contact Dr. Chasson to determine your fee. The initial consultation is 2 hours and costs twice the hourly fee.

A portion of the cost of treatment might be reimbursed through your mental health insurance if (1) you have a plan that allows for out-of-network reimbursement, (2) you submit invoices to your insurance (OCS Chicago can provide you with invoices), and (3) a deductible has been met, if you have a deductible. Please note that most instances of reimbursement account for only a portion of Dr. Chasson’s session fee. Why? Many insurance companies believe a psychotherapy session is worth less money than what was actually charged by the provider. The insurance company therefore caps the reimbursement amount based on what they believe is a fair charge. In addition, there is usually a reduction in reimbursement based on a plan-specific patient co-pay/co-insurance amount. Find out more by contacting your insurance company, including finding out reimbursement rates, deductible amounts, and co-pay/co-insurance adjustment. When speaking with the insurance company, please refer to reimbursement rates for service codes 90834 (standard 45-minute psychotherapy session) and 90791 (standard psychological evaluation). These are called CPT codes (i.e., Current Procedural Terminology codes for treatment services).

Please note that patients are fully responsible for remitting payment at the time services are rendered and are also responsible for corresponding with their insurance company when arranging for and obtaining reimbursement.

On a patient-by-patient basis, Dr. Chasson is open to the idea of entering into special contracts with certain insurance companies at his discretion (e.g., a single-case agreement or non-participating provider agreement). This means that he might be willing to sign an agreement that allows him to take your insurance as if he were an in-network provider. In this situation, for you costs of services would be handled like any other in-network service (i.e., you would most likely be responsible for a co-pay or co-insurance, if anything at all) in that Dr. Chasson would seek reimbursement directly from the insurance company. Please note, however, that in circumstances in which the agreement does not permit full reimbursement for the service as billed by OCS Chicago, the patient will be charge the remaining balance (i.e., difference between reimbursement rate from the insurance and OCS Chicago service charge; balance billing) to the extent allowable by the insurance agreement. To learn more about this insurance approach, which could be a more affordable alternative to paying out-of-pocket for services at Obsessive-Compulsive Solutions of Chicago, please read Dr. Fred Penzel’s excellent article.

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Is the financial cost worth it?

The cost of effective treatment can be burdensome, but Obsessive-Compulsive Solutions of Chicago addresses these financial concerns by (1) assisting patients with obtaining partial reimbursement through out-of-network insurance benefits when appropriate and possible, (2) using effective and time-limited treatment approaches instead of the indefinite or long-term approaches that are typical of more traditional psychotherapy models, and (3) on a patient-by-patient basis, remaining open to the idea of entering into special contracts with certain insurance companies at Dr. Chasson’s discretion (e.g., a single-case agreement or non-participating provider agreement).

The cost of treatment is an investment in your future. Obsessive-compulsive spectrum conditions and fear, worry, anxiety can be debilitating, affecting your ability to work, take care of household tasks, engage in meaningful relationships, and tend to family. Financially prioritizing treatment can have a positive and lasting effect that spreads throughout all facets of your life.

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What forms of payment do you accept?

We accept cash, check, money order, and credit card (Visa, MasterCard, American Express, and Discover). We also accept payment using health spending accounts.

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Are you handicap accessible?

Yes, the building and suite are handicap accessible.

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Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT)


 What does CBT involve?

Please see the What is CBT? page for details.

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How long does a course of CBT last?

While CBT is meant to be a time-limited approach, there is some flexibility with respect to treatment length. The answer depends on many factors, including the type of services and techniques, the complexity of the presenting clinical problem(s), the patient’s level of effort (including consistency in attendance and completion of at-home exercises), the patient’s ongoing response to treatment (have they shown any improvements to date?), the individual’s general strengths and weaknesses, and the patient’s prior knowledge of and history with the psychiatric condition and its treatment.

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How long are standard outpatient CBT sessions?

Most commonly, patients engage in a weekly 45- or 50-minute session. This general approach changes if the patient requires additional or fewer sessions per week, or if a longer session is necessary to accommodate behavioral exercises.

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Can CBT cure my disorder?

At this time, there are no medical cures for these disorders. However, evidence suggests that CBT is effective for treating a range of disorders, including obsessive-compulsive spectrum conditions and fear, worry, anxiety. For many of these conditions, CBT can eliminate symptoms or minimize them to negligible levels. CBT is considered successful when it results in decreased distress, improved life functioning, and enhanced quality of life. However, sometimes residual symptoms remain.

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Do I need medication, CBT, or both?

This question requires a careful assessment. Ultimately, the effectiveness of combining medications and CBT depends on the psychiatric condition in question, as well as the unique presentation and history of the patient.

Obsessive-Compulsive Solutions of Chicago does not provide specific recommendations regarding medication management. However, referrals for local psychopharmacological experts are available upon request.

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Will you be interpreting my childhood or dreams?

In contrast to many traditional psychotherapy approaches, CBT is concrete, active, present-focused, and empirical. It is relatively uncommon for a CBT provider to emphasize ambiguous unconscious processes, like dreams. Similarly, while the childhood origin of maladaptive patterns of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors might be a topic of therapeutic discussion, CBT focuses predominantly on more current problems and solutions. However, CBT can incorporate a patient’s beliefs about unconscious processes or childhood experiences, especially if the beliefs are relevant to the CBT technique and presenting problem. Please see the What is CBT? page to learn more about CBT.

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Are my symptoms too unique to respond to CBT?

This is a common concern for many patients. CBT tends to address the underlying cognitive, behavioral, and emotional mechanisms of psychiatric conditions, instead of surface-level themes or features. For example, exposure-based CBT can decrease debilitating fear, no matter how it manifests, such as contamination in obsessive-compulsive disorder, embarrassment in social anxiety disorder, or spiders in specific phobia. However, if you are concerned about the uniqueness of your symptoms and are unsure if CBT is appropriate for you, please contact Obsessive-Compulsive Solutions of Chicago to set up an assessment/consultation.

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Should I try CBT again if I’ve done it before?

While CBT is the gold-standard psychological intervention for obsessive-compulsive spectrum conditions and fear, worry, anxiety disorders, relapse or symptom flare-ups are not uncommon, especially during times of heightened stress. CBT can help you get back on track with booster sessions or another course of treatment.

In addition, patients are sometimes misinformed or misled to believe that they’ve received CBT or a specific CBT technique. If this mislabeled treatment then fails, CBT is sometimes erroneously blamed. If you believe that you’ve received ineffective or questionable CBT in the past, it might be worth requesting an assessment/consultation by contacting Obsessive-Compulsive Solutions of Chicago.

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General Questions


Do you provide support services to the community?

On a limited and seasonal basis, Obsessive-Compulsive Solutions of Chicago can provide workshops and presentations to the community and organizations on the nature and treatment of obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders and fear, worry, and anxiety. Similar services can be provided for topics related to cognitive-behavioral therapy more generally.

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Are there any research studies I can participate in?

While Obsessive-Compulsive Solutions of Chicago is not currently conducting clinical research, its owner–Dr. Chasson–directs a clinical psychology research program, called the Repetitive Experiences and Behavior Lab (REBL), in the Department of Psychology at Illinois Institute of Technology. For available research opportunities, please check out the REBL website.

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Where can I go for additional information?

Please see the Resources page.

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